Tag Archives: Cloves

My Corned Beef Worked!!!

Two weeks ago, I started a batch of corned beef. As I mentioned, this was a continuation of experiments with fermented foods. I have created sauerkraut and pickled onions using this method, and I figured corned beef would be fun to try. I’ve been checking in on the meat every few days, looking for signs of spoilage (mold, funny smells, etc.) Yesterday, I decided it was time to try cooking and eating the product. Continue reading

More Ginger Ale

I just finished a 1-gallon (4-liter) jar of pickles, so I decided to make my largest batch of ginger ale so far. If you’ve seen my previous post on ginger ale, you know that this recipe involves fermenting the ale long enough to flavor it and to carbonate the drink, but not long enough to make it alcoholic. I tweaked my old recipe after I tasted it, and I would like to share my updated recipe with you all. Continue reading

Corned Beef Update (Day 3)

Hi everyone! I just checked in on my corned beef, which was due to be turned over today. It’s looking amazing! The first thing I notice when I opened the lid was that the liquid had turned from clear to beautiful deep brown. This is interesting, but probably just an effect of meat juices oxidizing.  I didn’t see any floating mold, which is promising. With veggies, mold like that can just be skimmed off, but I would be paranoid with meat. Does anyone have any experience with this? Continue reading

First Try at Corned Beef

I’ve made sauerkraut and fermented onions in the past, and I have been playing with the idea of making corned beef, which uses similar principles and techniques. While traditionally made from beef brisket, I used chuck because of the price difference. I picked up these 4.5 lbs at Costco for $20.  The idea behind this recipe is that, by keeping the food in a salty environment and reducing the amount of oxygen, Lactobacillus bacteria will preserve the food by removing sugars and creating an acidic environment. These two conditions, along with the salt added by the recipe, prevent other organisms from growing and spoiling the food. This recipe is especially cool because it doesn’t use any sodium nitrate or other artificial preservatives that are found in commercial corned beef.  On top of this, the lactic acid produced by Lactobacilli adds flavor to the food. Continue reading